About Statutes

This page accesses the Code of Maryland (Statutes) and the Maryland Municipal Charters and Resolutions as compiled and maintained by the Department of Legislative Services.

The Code is arranged by and organized into “Articles” (e.g. Transportation Article), which are further subdivided into “titles”, “subtitles”, “sections”, “subsections”, “paragraphs”, subparagraphs”, etc.

Note that the “official” compilation of the laws (Chapters) enacted at each session of the General Assembly is published by the State as the “Laws of Maryland”, commonly referred to as the “Session Laws”. The Session Laws for each session are compiled chronologically by chapter number and serve as the source law from which the statutes accessed here are derived.

While the “Laws of Maryland” (Session Laws) constitute the official laws of the State, this Code and the annotated versions noted below are accepted as “evidence” of the law in all State courts and by all public offices and officials (See § 10-201 of the Courts & Judicial Proceedings Article). However, in the event of a conflict between the Code and the Session Laws, the Session Laws prevail.

Note: Annotated versions of the Code, published by LexisNexis and West, are available in book and online formats. These Annotated Codes include references to case law, related citations, and explanatory notations.

The Municipal Charters are updated each year by incorporating all charter resolutions received by the Department through May 31 of that year. Individual Municipal Resolutions are published to the General Assembly website as they are received by the Department.



Statute Text

ati285170.tmp
Article - Transportation
§2–103.7.  
(a)    (1)   In this section the following words have the meanings indicated.
(2)   “Major capital project” has the meaning stated in § 2–103.1 of this subtitle.
(3)    (i)   “Major transportation project” means a major capital project in the State Highway Administration or the Maryland Transit Administration whose total cost for all phases exceeds $5,000,000 and that:
1.   Increases highway or transit capacity;
2.   Improves transit stations or station areas; or
3.   Improves highway capacity through the use of intelligent transportation systems or congestion management systems.
(ii)   “Major transportation project” does not include:
1.   Projects in the Maryland Aviation Administration, the Maryland Port Administration, or the Maryland Transportation Authority;
2.   Maintenance and storage facilities projects;
3.   Water quality improvement projects;
4.   Projects related to Maryland’s priorities for total maximum daily load development;
5.   Safety–related projects that do not increase highway or transit capacity; or
6.   Roads within the Appalachian Development Highway System.
(b)   The Department shall:
(1)   In accordance with federal transportation requirements, develop a project–based scoring system using the goals and measures established under subsection (c) of this section;
(2)   Develop the weighting metrics for each goal and measure established under subsection (c) of this section;
(3)   On or before January 1, 2017, adopt regulations to carry out the provisions of this section; and
(4)   In accordance with the project–based scoring system developed under this subsection, rank major transportation projects for inclusion in the draft and final Consolidated Transportation Program.
(c)    (1)   The State transportation goals are:
(i)   Safety and security;
(ii)   System preservation;
(iii)   Quality of service;
(iv)   Environmental stewardship;
(v)   Community vitality;
(vi)   Economic prosperity;
(vii)   Equitable access to transportation;
(viii)   Cost effectiveness and return on investment; and
(ix)   Local priorities and planning.
(2)   In evaluating whether and to what extent a major transportation project satisfies the goals established under paragraph (1) of this subsection, the Department, using a 20–year forecast in the project area, shall assign a score from 1 to 100 for each goal using the following measures:
(i)   For safety and security:
1.   The expected reduction in total fatalities and severe injuries in all modes affected by the project; and
2.   The extent to which the project implements the Maryland State Highway Administration’s Complete Streets policies.
(ii)   For system preservation:
1.   The degree to which the project increases the lifespan of the affected facility;
2.   The degree to which the project increases the functionality of the facility; and
3.   The degree to which the project renders the facility more resilient.
(iii)   For quality of service:
1.   The expected change in cumulative job accessibility within an approximately 60–minute commute for highway projects or transit projects;
2.   The degree to which the project has a positive impact on travel time reliability; and
3.   The degree to which the project supports connections between different modes of transportation and promotes multiple transportation choices.
(iv)   For environmental stewardship:
1.   The potential of the project to limit or reduce harmful emissions;
2.   The degree to which the project avoids impacts on State resources in the project area and adjacent areas; and
3.   The degree to which the project advances the State environmental goals.
(v)   For community vitality:
1.   The degree to which the project is projected to increase the use of walking, biking, and transit;
2.   The degree to which the project enhances existing community assets; and
3.   The degree to which the project furthers the affected community’s and State’s plans for revitalization.
(vi)   For economic prosperity:
1.   The projected increase in the cumulative job accessibility within an approximately 60–minute commute for projects;
2.   The extent to which the project is projected to enhance access to critical intermodal locations for the movement of goods and services; and
3.   The projected increase in furthering nonspeculative local and State economic development strategies in existing communities.
(vii)   For equitable access to transportation:
1.   The expected increase in job accessibility for disadvantaged populations within an approximately 60–minute commute for projects; and
2.   The projected economic development impact on low–income communities.
(viii)    For cost effectiveness and return on investment:
1.   The estimated travel time savings divided by the project cost;
2.   The degree to which the project leverages additional federal, State, local, and private sector transportation investment; and
3.   The degree to which the project will increase transportation alternatives and redundancy.
(ix)   For local priorities and planning, the degree to which the project supports local government land use plans and goals.
(3)   The Department shall multiply the total combined score of each major transportation project by a weighting factor equal to one plus the results of dividing the population in the area served by the project, as determined in regulations adopted by the Department, by the population of Maryland.
(d)    (1)   The score of a major transportation project shall be based solely on the goals and measures established under subsection (c) of this section.
(2)   Except as provided under paragraph (3) of this subsection, the Department shall prioritize major transportation projects with higher scores for inclusion in the Consolidated Transportation Program over major transportation projects with lower scores.
(3)   The Department may include in the Consolidated Transportation Program a major transportation project with a lower score over a major transportation project with a higher score if it provides in writing a rational basis for the decision.
(e)   Nothing in this section may be construed to impede or alter:
(1)   The priority letter process that outlines local transportation priorities for the Department’s consideration for inclusion in the Consolidated Transportation Program under § 2–103.1 of this subtitle; or
(2)   The Department’s visit to each county under § 2–103.1(e) of this subtitle.